Tuesday, 16th July 2024

Gen Z will make up 27% of world’s workforce in 2025: World Citizenship Report 2024

This report remains the flagship analysis of the most concerning issues facing global citizens, with this year’s theme being Responsibility amid electoral changes. 

Monday, 27th May 2024

Gen Z will make up 27% of world’s workforce in 2025: World Citizenship Report 2024
The 3rd edition of the highly awaited World Citizenship Report 2024 has been released by CS Global Partners. This year’s edition primarily focuses on the upcoming 2024 global elections and the participation of youth in the electoral process.  This report remains the flagship analysis of the most concerning issues facing global citizens, with this year’s theme being Responsibility amid electoral changes.  As this year will be the largest global election year in history, the World Citizenship Report provides insights into the new generation and their role in this huge process. The report noted that young voters are speaking up in elections around the world, particularly on migration and climate debates. They are utilizing a newfound tool for this engagement: social media. [caption id="attachment_71749" align="aligncenter" width="500"] The 2024 World Citizenship Report focuses on the upcoming global elections, and the thoughts of high-net-worth-individuals (HNWIs) regarding this tumultuous global period.[/caption] It was emphasized that content t creators on TikTok have identified the app as a helpful tool to gain visibility for their political activism, leveraging it in the discourse of the 2024 elections. However, young people contend that older generations — who tend to dominate the leadership of governments and legislatures — have not kept up with the demands of young people. WCR said that social media is especially popular among Generation Z, the demographic cohort born between the years 1997 to 2012. The report also noted that the 2024 elections may constitute the first or second election in Generation Z’s lifetime.  In a significant development, the WCR highlighted that With 25 percent of the world’s population growing, Gen Z will also make up 27 percent of the world’s workforce in 2025. The Generation is known for being independent, questioning authority, and asserting political opinions via technology and internet platforms. Talking about the young popular, the CEO of CS Global Partners cited, “For younger, politically engaged global citizens, the 2024 elections present a platform to speak out about the issues which will affect them and future generations. For them, responsibility and trust go hand in hand. She said that this report has also shed light on whether youth can trust older, more powerful generations overrepresented in governance to protect the environment, foster economic growth, and promote sensible migratory policies.

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While shedding light on youth participation in the 2020 American Presidential Election, the report mentioned that it saw a whopping 289% increase in Gen Z participation by raw vote total, and as more of this generation comes into the electorate, they will occupy an even greater percentage of it.  In addition to this, it was also mentioned that given the political engagement of this generation, one might expect politicians to employ newer social media tools to match Gen Z’s engagement. However, as of now, a New York Times analysis of politicians’ social media accounts found that politicians are neglecting platforms such as TikTok as a mode of political engagement with young people.  The report said that the generation is making the best possible use of social media as they connect with their peers, building large followings through constant digital communication. While mentioning Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, the WCR stated, “Greta Thunberg, a 21-year-old climate activist, utilizes Instagram and Twitter posts to build a generational following. Gen Z argues that older generations have a responsibility to mitigate the environmental impact of their actions as it is they (Gen Z) who will have to live their full lives within deteriorating environmental conditions.” Not only this but Gen Z’s demands to be heard on issues disproportionately impacting their generation are leading some countries to do more to involve youth in their decision-making, particularly around climate change. While citing examples of the active participation of youth at international levels, the report said that St. Kitts and Nevis attended the COP28 climate conference in December 2023 and hosted a youth panel. DOWNLOAD THE FULL REPORT HERE Aiming to hear from young people about the issues that will acutely affect them, the country held a ‘Youth Spotlight on Sustainability’ roundtable with youth delegates from different nations. It remains to be seen if other countries will follow suit in convening dialogues with young people or, indeed if these dialogues will then be translated into policy that will benefit Gen Z.